Why chocolate is not the culprit in your failed diet

Posted: February 13, 2010 in Chocolate Articles
Tags: , , ,

“I’m on a diet no chocolates for me” you say. Have you ever considered what else you eat apart from chocolates? Nothing else? Then, the chocolates are not to blame. You know better than to eat only chocolates all day. It’s simply unhealthy to eat only one food group. Nutritionists recommend a balanced diet. It is necessary to obtain and maintain a healthy Body Mass Index. 8 small dark chocolate squares or 39g of dark chocolate a day is what is required to combat stress. So if you’re not stressed plan to eat less than that quantity a day. Even the manufacturers request some wisdom – be treat wise.

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Comments
  1. Chocolate can be a gift for body, mind and spirit – if used in moderation and meditatively. American’s love affair with chocolate tallies an astounding 3 billion pounds per year.

    Given as a token of love on Valentine’s Day, it even loves us back – providing beneficial nutrients like iron, calcium, potassium and magnesium in addition to vitamins A, E and other antioxidants, dispelling our bad moods and literally providing food for thought by renewing our spirits and launching our meditations.

    Dark chocolate, with its higher percentage of cocoa solids and the flavanols and antioxidants they contain, is particularly correlated with improvements in joint and arterial health and brain function, and lowering of hypertension and pre-menstrual tension. Chocolate has also been found to increase the level of serotonin in the brain, a neurotransmitter associated with lifting depression.

    To test the theory that chocolate enhances mood, a study was conducted at the University of Pennsylvania, with students consuming the actual product vs. pills containing stimulants found in chocolate. The real product provided the best results, suggesting that it is not the chemical ingredients in chocolate that provide the euphoria, but the sensory experience… the delicious taste, seductive smell and silky smoothness. The researchers concluded that, “Perhaps the mood-enhancing chemicals are just the ‘icing on the cake.'”

    Chocolate is a product derived from the fruit of the cacao tree, Theobroma cacao that means “food of the gods.” This tree evolved in the wild in South America where the Aztecs, Mayans and other ancient civilizations used the roasted cacao bean to make a bitter drink that was considered sacred.

    Ancient Hawaii will also be linked with the savoring of chocolate at Aloha International’s Huna Talk on Sunday evening, March 7, at 7 p.m. in Volcano’s Cooper Center. The principles of Huna (an ancient Hawaiian philosophy of life and healing) will be explored, using chocolate as both an experience and as a metaphor to gain new perspectives on how we make choices in life.

    “Huna gives each of us a variety of perspectives on life that help to empower us, bring us into our bodies more thoroughly and make it possible to enjoy life more deeply,” said Aloha International Alakai, Stewart Blackburn. “Like many aspects of life, our reaction to chocolate can teach us a lot about ourselves and how we can better shape our lives.

    “In the context of Huna, chocolate can be a symbol of the sweetness of life,” explained Blackburn. “Our love of chocolate reminds us that love is what satisfies us the most. By paying attention to the things we love, and appreciating those we love, we can powerfully craft our lives around what fulfills us and gives our lives meaning.”

    For a taste, visit http://www.squidoo.com/Chocolate-Therapy for a meditation you can do in the time it takes to eat a piece of chocolate. For more on Huna, go to http://www.Huna.org. For chocolate’s effect on the chakras, see my blog at chakradiaries.

  2. chocolatatoi says:

    Thanks a lot for your comment chakradiaries. It’s really full of insight into chocolate and its benefits.

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